Monthly Archives: June 2014

Shopping Hot Spots near London Victoria District

If you are crazy about shopping, London is one place to fuel up your desire. The UK’s cultural capital is a place that has something for everyone. This is one reason why visitors from all over the world gather here at least once a year and turn shopaholic. This is one destination where you can find anything from antiques to foods.

Besides being second busiest hub of transport, London is also a place for quality shopping. Just head towards Elizabeth Street, opposite the Buckingham Palace Road and you will find everything according to your need including specialist shops and elegant boutiques. Many departmental stores such as the House of Fraser are also located in Victoria.

H.R. Stokes

Since the past 150 years, H.R Strokes stood test of times and has gained popularity through its unmatched quality and proficiency. Here you can also find all the necessary items and gifts ideas besides books and personal stationary. The discerning Belgravia resident find the shop as an ideal one providing invitations and letterheads. With the inclusion of latest proficiencies and patterns, the classic repertoire just got better than ever before.

Alfies Antique Market

The market is approximately twenty minutes by tube from Victoria. From collectibles, antiques, 20th century designing, rare collection and vintage clothes Alfies Antique Market has everything for everyone. With more than 600 stalls on offer, that provides shoppers everything according to their need. Furthermore, you can also find a rooftop cafe at Alfies Antique market.

Rippon Cheese Stores

A true Victorian resident has a strong bond of attraction towards Rippon Cheese. For the last 20 years, the store has provided the best cheese available elsewhere. With the royal seal of approval of Victorian residents, Rippon Cheese Stores can lay a claim that not many aren’t be able to brag about.

Borough Market

The market is 18 minutes by tube from Victoria District. With a huge range of 70 stalls and stands, Borough Market facilitates gourmet food producers all across the country. Here you will find all sorts of items including patisseries, fish, meats, ciders, vegetables, breads, cheeses, cakes, and coffees.

Victoria Place Shopping

Victoria Place Shopping Centre is ideal shoppers stop 0.15 miles away from Victoria Station. There are varieties of goods such as fashion, food accessories, electrical items, etc. Here you will also find supermarkets, shops, and restaurants.

Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Facebook Share on Pinterest Share on twitter

What’s on in London in June, 2014

Weather is heating up and so is the events calendar in London. In the month of June, the capital is buzzing with some of the most popular events. Are you ready for it? Let’s have a closer look to the five main events taking place every summer:

Motorexpo, Canary Wharf

Motorexpo evolved in 1996 as an alternate to the London Motorfair and British International Motor Show. The purpose of launching such an event in Canary Wharf was to ensure that office workers might get an opportunity to see new cars, whereas the other show comprised classic cars only. Motoexpo gave a chance to witness first-hand the latest cars without charging any fee for it. This year the tournament will begin from 9 to 15 June, 2014.

Trooping the Colour

The regiments of British and Commonwealth armies have been performing this ceremony for ages. According to the official records, this has been an on-going tradition since the 17th century although the roots go back to much earlier than that. Since 1748, ‘Trooping the Colour’ also honours the Queen on her birthday, and it is celebrated with a 41 gun salute.

The Queen inspects her troops and see her birthday parade been performed every 14 June. On 36 different occasions, the Queen has mounted wearing her regiment’s uniform. Since1987, she has preferred been transported by carriage. Approximately 1400 men and officers participate in the parade along with 400 musicians and 200 horses.

City of London Festival

This annual festival was born in 1962 mainly as a music festival, but nowadays offer events programmed across a wide range of art forms including dance, film, poetry, guided tours and lectures. Many of the activities are free with the aim being to make the arts accessible to everyone. Some of the venues are Finsbury Circus Gardens, Guildhall Yard, and Liverpool Street Station.

The festival lasts for three weeks in the months of June and July. Every year, the theme is different and features cultures from various parts of the world such as France, Japan, and Dutch. This year it will be held from 22 June to 17 July featuring the city of Seoul.

Carnival de Cuba

This is one of the largest free festivals recognising Cuban Culture in Europe. It features children’s events, live salsa bands, dance, food, and drink. The event takes place at London’s Southwark Park and over 50,000 attendees come to witness it every year.

Royal Ascot

The history of Royal Ascot dates back to 1711 when Queen Anne saw the potential platform where horseracing was to be carried out. With a 300 year old history, Royal Ascot has everything including the finest horses and jockeys.  Royal Ascot 2014 takes place from 17 to 21 June this year.

With quality entertainment and minimal charges (mostly free), what more can you ask for. Visit London this June and have the best time of your life.

 

 

Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Facebook Share on Pinterest Share on twitter

What modern generation should know about Victoria District in London

Named after Queen Victoria and known as one of the busiest transport hubs today, the history of Victoria District is an orthodox one. Since Victorian Era, this place has had something for everyone, including Turkish baths and suicide pits. It was with the Industrial Revolution that Victorian lifestyle changed drastically.

During the Victorian period (1837-1901), the city of London was recognised as the largest, whereas New York came second. Victoria became queen ruler at the age of 16 years, at a time when the British Empire was considered as the one where the sun never sets. This was because During the Victorian period (1837-1901), the city of London was recognised as the largest, whereas New York came second.

Victoria became queen ruler at the age of 16 years, at a time when the British Empire was considered as the one where the sun never sets. This was because its expanse across the globe meant that the sun was always shining on at least one of its territories.

The population of Victoria District continued to grow by 1901 and had twice the amount of people as compared to New York. However, the condition of the citizens was not at all good by any means and the population rose drastically to 6.7 million.

Even the Queen had nine children: Beatrice, Edward, Alfred, Arthur, Leopold, Victoria, Alice, Helena, and Louise. In order to survive, the poor families used to send their children to the workhouses since the age of five. They didn’t go to school and worked during that time to earn 25 pounds annually to support their parents.

The population of Victoria District continued to grow by 1901 and had twice the amount of people as compared to New York. However, the condition of the citizens was not at all good by any means and the population rose drastically to 6.7 million.

Even the Queen had nine children: Beatrice, Edward, Alfred, Arthur, Leopold, Victoria, Alice, Helena, and Louise. In order to survive, the poor families used to send their children to the workhouses since the age of five. They did not go to school and worked during that time to earn 25 pounds annually to support their parents.

The conditions in the workhouse were not easy for children also featured highlighted in Charles Dickens’ Oliver Twist. On the other hand, the rich had slightly better lifestyle as compared to their poor counterparts. The children from rich families were provided tutors or governesses to ensure that they would receive quality education.

By the summer of 1858 a lot of pollution, which gave rise to foul smelling and heavy air, surrounded the city. A dense yellow fog surrounded the city most of the times and domestic fireplaces were the main culprits. The thick fog forced people to wear black outfits, as any other colour would turn grey.

Due to the unavailability of a proper sewerage system, River Thames had become a dumping spot since centuries, resulting in completely drying up. In 1858, London came to a halt, as people refused to leave their homes unless the government would take action. Clean water became the most important issue as the population of the city continued to rise.

The problem was already identified during 1600, however the urge to solve it wasn’t there. By 1858 River Thames was filled with human and animal waste. The river became unhygienic and resulted in the outbreak of Cholera and various other diseases. As a result, more than 10,000 Londoners lost their lives and people began demanding for a proper solution.

Sir Joseph Bazalgette, an unlikely hero at that time, devised an efficient sewage system comprising 2100 km of pipes and tunnels, adding to his work with Albert, Embankment, Battersea, and Hammersmith Bridges. His efforts lead to betterment of the results bringing down the death rate of the city to a considerable extent.

To ensure that people drink clean water, the waste was carried away towards the sea. Sir Joseph Bazalgette’s work is still appreciated one hundred and forty years later and he is considered as hero of London history.

Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Facebook Share on Pinterest Share on twitter